Furikake Rice Balls

Furikake Rice Balls

 I did not know if it was just my laziness or post-travel fatigue from my last vacation to Japan that I had gotten very exhausted lately. Then, I scurried into the kitchen to grab a bite to eat and upon glancing in the fridge, I realized there was nothing to eat. Furikake Rice Balls came really handy at the time because they are very simple to make and versatile.

Furikake Rice Balls are literally rice and furikake mixed together and formed into small compact balls. I could just eat a bowl of rice with sprinkle of furikake as it is, but it did not seem that appetizing. Thus, I had the idea of forming the mixed rice into balls just like the one I did on my previous Seaweed Rice Balls recipe. They work magically and a few tablespoon of furikake adds a flavor kick to the plain rice. I really recommended these Furikake Rice Balls as a fun way to enjoy rice for a quick snack, or as school/work lunch or picnic food.

 

What is Furikake?

Have you heard of Japan’s furikake? Furikake refers to a range of dried mixed seasonings for sprinkling on rice. In Japan, it is common to enjoy rice just as it is. This is why furikake is rather prominent in Japanese daily life. It is nutty, crunchy, and adds umami flavor boost to the plain rice.

Furikake comes in a wide range of flavors, but typically consists of a mixture of dried fish, sesame seeds, chopped seaweed, sugar, salt, and monosodium glutamate. Katsuoboshi or bonito flakes, tiny pieces of freeze-dried salmon particles, shiso, egg, powdered miso, vegetables are also often added to the mix. Some furikake even contain dried wasabi, crushed perilla leaves, or even matcha green tea on occasion.

You can probably find furikake in your local Asian grocery store. However, if you can not find any there, you can always head online to buy some. I find Marumiya Furikake Japanese rice seasoning which offers a pretty great deal that you can buy at Amazon.

I got mine during my last vacation in Japan. The one on the very right is what my sister recommended me. Marumiya is one of the biggest names when it comes to furikake. The noritama flavor combines seaweed with egg granule. It is the most popular best-seller among colorful furikake products. For the other two, I just chose what seemed like pretty interesting by looks. I guessed they contained salmon from the fish picture on the package.

 

How to Make Furikake Rice Balls

Furikake Rice Balls are very simple to make. You just need to mix the rice with furikake, then form balls with your hand. Easy right?

Use short-medium grain rice because long grain rice is not sticky enough to hold together. I also recommend to use steaming rice because it is much easier to handle. For the ratio, add two tablespoons of furikake or more for a bowl of rice.

Put a plastic glove on one hand. Then, add little bit of oil on the plastic glove so that the rice does not stick to the plastic. I use sesame oil because it makes my rice balls fragrant and more appetizing, but any oil is fine. Put about 2 tablespoons of rice on your palm and squeeze lightly until the rice sticks together. Shape it into a ball and it is ready to serve.

 

 

 

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Furikake Rice Balls

Furikake Rice Balls are rice and furikake mixed together and formed into small compact balls. They are perfect for quick snacks, lunch, or even picnic food.

Course Lunch, Snack
Cuisine Japanese
Keyword Rice Balls
Prep Time 5 minutes
Total Time 5 minutes
Servings 6

Ingredients

  • 1 1/2 bowls steaming short-medium grain rice
  • 3 tbsp furikake
  • sesame oil

Instructions

  1. In a medium bowl, mix cooked rice and furikake until incorporated.

  2. Put a plastic glove on one hand. Add little bit of oil on the plastic glove so that the rice does not stick. Put 2 tablespoons of rice on your palm and squeeze lightly until the rice sticks together. Shape it into a ball. 

  3. Repeat until the rice is finished and serve.



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